Japanese leaflet holders ‘rejected’ for photos of their wedding by US Army

Japanese leaflets were left at the doorstep of Japanese soldiers during the American invasion of Japan in December 1941 and were used to sell souvenirs to American troops.

Japanese soldiers were given leaflets by American soldiers that described their military duties and the Allied victory. 

The Japanese soldiers received leaflets by mail and they wrote down their names, addresses, dates and telephone numbers.

The soldiers were also given photographs of their wives and children.

The leaflets were intended to sell as souvenirs.

Japanese military authorities rejected the leaflets and sent them back.

The leaflet collectors were given a second chance to collect their war souvenirs and they have been collecting for more than 50 years. 

Now a group of Japanese war veterans is planning to put up the war souvenir posters at the ceremony. 

 They have been trying to make it to the ceremony for decades but the Japanese military refused to allow them to put their war medals and medals of other countries on the posters.

The group has started a petition that aims to bring about a change in the Japanese government’s attitude towards war souveniers. 

“We want to be able to see their names on the poster and they want to have the privilege of being able to put that on their walls,” said Saitou Yoshizaki, the group’s leader. 

Yoshizaki said the group is willing to put posters up in their own homes if the government allows them to do so.

“We are not asking for money, we are just asking for the government to be more accommodating and help us out in this matter,” he said. 

Japanese War Veterans Association president Hiroshi Shimizu said he was surprised that the Japanese authorities did not allow the group to put the war medals on the leaflets. 

They are planning to take the posters to the upcoming ceremony in Hiroshima on January 8. 

Source: Associated Press