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WHO warns of food poisoning in Pakistan after leaflet hits classrooms

HEALTH workers are warning of the dangers of leaflet heatmaps, which they say could cause health problems if used widely.

“It’s an important message that we want to raise awareness about the dangers,” said Dr. Farhana Haider, an epidemiologist at the World Health Organization’s Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).

“We want to alert people to the importance of making sure that we’re getting the right information and the right kind of information.”

The OCHA issued a leaflet with the warning on Wednesday in the wake of a recent spike in cases of H1N1 coronavirus, or H1, which is spreading through Pakistan.

The warning comes after the government and some local health workers have expressed concerns about the use of the images on the leaflets, which are widely available in schools and libraries.

In response to the leaflet, Pakistan’s Health Ministry said it would be “more cautious” about using the images, which the ministry said could cause a spike in infections.

The government has since warned that the images can be used to spread misinformation.

“We’re looking at it and we’ll see what happens, but we are going to be more cautious and more cautious in the future,” said OCHA spokesman Shahzad Malik.

Last week, OCHA warned of the risks of using the heatmap images on social media.

WHO warns of food poisoning in Pakistan after leaflet hits classrooms

HEALTH workers are warning of the dangers of leaflet heatmaps, which they say could cause health problems if used widely.

“It’s an important message that we want to raise awareness about the dangers,” said Dr. Farhana Haider, an epidemiologist at the World Health Organization’s Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).

“We want to alert people to the importance of making sure that we’re getting the right information and the right kind of information.”

The OCHA issued a leaflet with the warning on Wednesday in the wake of a recent spike in cases of H1N1 coronavirus, or H1, which is spreading through Pakistan.

The warning comes after the government and some local health workers have expressed concerns about the use of the images on the leaflets, which are widely available in schools and libraries.

In response to the leaflet, Pakistan’s Health Ministry said it would be “more cautious” about using the images, which the ministry said could cause a spike in infections.

The government has since warned that the images can be used to spread misinformation.

“We’re looking at it and we’ll see what happens, but we are going to be more cautious and more cautious in the future,” said OCHA spokesman Shahzad Malik.

Last week, OCHA warned of the risks of using the heatmap images on social media.

WHO warns of food poisoning in Pakistan after leaflet hits classrooms

HEALTH workers are warning of the dangers of leaflet heatmaps, which they say could cause health problems if used widely.

“It’s an important message that we want to raise awareness about the dangers,” said Dr. Farhana Haider, an epidemiologist at the World Health Organization’s Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).

“We want to alert people to the importance of making sure that we’re getting the right information and the right kind of information.”

The OCHA issued a leaflet with the warning on Wednesday in the wake of a recent spike in cases of H1N1 coronavirus, or H1, which is spreading through Pakistan.

The warning comes after the government and some local health workers have expressed concerns about the use of the images on the leaflets, which are widely available in schools and libraries.

In response to the leaflet, Pakistan’s Health Ministry said it would be “more cautious” about using the images, which the ministry said could cause a spike in infections.

The government has since warned that the images can be used to spread misinformation.

“We’re looking at it and we’ll see what happens, but we are going to be more cautious and more cautious in the future,” said OCHA spokesman Shahzad Malik.

Last week, OCHA warned of the risks of using the heatmap images on social media.